Ten years of Human Capacity Training

Training for new capacities

The 2021 cohort in a workshop
The 2021 cohort in a workshop

León, Nicaragua

The keys to working and living from the soil: Experiences of 10 recent graduates from the HCT 2021 cohort.

Human training is a process focused on issues of empowerment and sustainability, gender equity, economic empowerment and others, that reduce vulnerability and promote participation in spaces that are regularly occupied by men, and in which women have been made invisible.

The HCT program and other social programs that ViviendasLeón has developed in the rural areas of Sutiava - Nicaragua seek, on the one hand, new livelihoods and autonomy for women and on the other hand, guarantees against, and prevents the abuses and violence faced by women in Nicaragua and in other countries in the region.

In 2021 we welcomed ten new families into the cohort who joined the training process, reflection workshops and trainings. This cohort creates a safe space for learning and training for rural women who come from the different neighborhoods that make up the community of Troilo. These women have great potential to transform their lives and those of their families. The HTC program reduces the social stigmas and culture of violence created by gender inequalities, and is an incubator to develop future projects that would be implemented in the short and medium term to meet the practical needs of food, water, education and local economic expansion to restore rural communities.

Faviola Chavarria, Deyanira Espinoza, Gabriela Davila, Martha Cano, Yamileth Davila, Argentina Muñoz, Mercedes Artola, Sarahi Pacheco, Juana Artola and Yaqueline Muñoz, were the ten members who participated.

Conducting a workshop in 2012
Conducting a workshop in 2012

‘’You have to get out to learn.’’ Mercedes Artola
''Before I began agricultural work, I attended workshops and learned about topics and things that I never knew. I learned that as a woman I can be head of my household. I learned that women can contribute with our work to the economy of our families and communities. I know that to move out of poverty we have to get out to learn. Now I no longer leave the house to sell things on the street. I can grow, harvest and sell vegetables from my farm"


The information, knowledge and theories learned in the various workshops, meetings and forums alone have no effect without the practical application of the knowledge they learned in HCT. In the application of it, these 10 women achieved real change.

With the cohort completed in December 2021, Viviendas León contributed to the fulfillment of Goal 10 of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: the reduction of  inequalities, affirming the right of rural women to receive training, agricultural technical development and productive techniques. This is in order to improve their quality of life, break the cycles of violence, improve their livelihoods and build sustainable communities socially, economically and ecologically.

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